The Network Science for National Defense Symposium Overview-- June 21st, 2015 (09:00-13:00)

The Network Science for National Defense Symposium is part of the "NetSci 2015" conference taking place 21-25 June 2017 in Indianapolis, Indiana. For full details of the workshop click here, or for the main conference visit the NetSci site using the logo link on the left.

Please email Ralucca Gera (rgera@nps.edu), Jesse Hammond (jrhammon@nps.edu) or Jon Roginksi (Jonathan.Roginski@usma.edu)  if interested in attending.

Background

Network Science and other emerging data science methods have proven to be very effective for improving understanding and analysis in U.S. national security and intelligence missions. Because of the nature of these missions however, the benefit from these new analytic methods has not spread in a programmatic way to other mission areas in the Department of Defense. Individual organizations are beginning to use these methods in the social sciences to gain deeper understanding of human behavior for missions like personnel readiness and force management. This symposium will provide an opportunity to exchange these emerging ideas, expose network science practitioners to the important personnel issues in national defense, and allow DoD mission owners to explore the practical application of network science and other methods in addressing the issues facing the U.S. Department of Defense.

Symposium Overview

One of the U.S. Army’s foundational documents, its Operating Concept, asserts “the future operational environment (OE) will be complex, dynamic, and shaped by the convergence of myriad global trends driven by social dynamics, nature, and technology. Pervasive characteristics of the OE include: increased velocity of human interaction and momentum of events; potential for overmatch; proliferation of weapons of mass destruction; spread of advanced cyberspace and counter-space capabilities; ease of technology transfer to state, nonstate, and hybrid actors; transparency and ubiquitous media; demographics, and operations among populations in megacities, dense urban areas, and in complex terrain.”

 We need not wait for the Armies of 2025 or 2040 to experience complexity in a mathematical sense. The systems which characterize our world - today, without waiting for the future - include large numbers of entities that are dynamic and adaptive, with this dynamicism and adaptivity resulting in emergent behavior. Large problems that are merely complicated may be disaggregated into their constituent parts, those smaller problems solved and those solutions aggregated to solve the original problems. Large problems that are complex, however, are irreducible; they cannot be solved through disaggregation because the interactions between those smaller components are often as important as the components themselves. Complex problems resist simplification. To find useful solutions, we must embrace the complexity with our modeling and solution techniques.

Organizations across the U.S. Department of Defense and beyond have recognized that to solve problems in which interactions are important we must employ the science of connections-- network science. Network science is an important component in the portfolios of each service’s research laboratory, and in the graduate and undergraduate institutions associated with each service. This symposium will contribute to strengthening the connections between DoD network scientists and provide the opportunity to connect and collaborate with network scientists from the greater NS community.

The proposed symposium will include a poster session as preparation for a targeted problem solving discussion. The intent of the discussion is to leverage the expertise of the network science community against solving the posed problems. Expected outcomes of the group discussions include a road map toward insight used by DoD leaders to make decisions. History has shown that the practicality of such discussions reaches beyond military decision making through corporate, civil service, and academic interests to future research and collaboration opportunities.

 Schedule -- June 1st, 2015 (09:00-12:00)

Network Science and other emerging data science methods have proven to be very effective for improving understanding and analysis in U.S. national security and intelligence missions. Because of the nature of these missions however, the benefit from these new analytic methods has not spread in a programmatic way to other mission areas in the Department of Defense. Individual organizations are beginning to use these methods in the social sciences to gain deeper understanding of human behavior for missions like personnel readiness and force management. This symposium will provide an opportunity to exchange these emerging ideas, expose network science practitioners to the important personnel issues in national defense, and allow DoD mission owners to explore the practical application of network science and other methods in addressing the issues facing the U.S. Department of Defense./p>

 

There will be 3 talks, followed by a poster lightening session. Use menu to the left to view Speakers and Topics.

Registration

  • 09:00-09:10 registration (sign ups sheet)
  • 09:00-09:10 welcome, introductions and overview

9:15-9:35 Poster Lightening Session (in this order) presenting academic and applied DoD sponsored work contributed by network science practitioners.

  • TBA
  • TBA

9:40: Invited Guest Speakers presenting challenges and problems facing the DoD.

  • "The Epidemiology of Extremism”, by Jordan Isham, United States Military Academy
  • "Discovering and Targeting Dark Networks", by Scott Warnke, United States Military Academy
  • "Purpose-driven communities in multiplex networks: thresholding user-engaged layer aggregation", by Ryan Miller, United States Military Academy
  • TBA, by Ralucca Gera, Naval Postgraduate School
  • TBA, by Matthew Begnini, Carnegie Mellon University
  • TBA, by Cade Saie, U.S. Army Cyber Command
  • TBA, by Matthew Dabkowski, Operations Research Center of Excellence
  • TBA, by Dan Evans, West Point Network Science Center
  • TBA, by Anthony Johnson, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

11: 40am Topic Breakout discussions leveraging the expertise of the network science community against solving the posed problems

  • 11:40 Overview of the topics and expectations of the working group (Jesse) 
  • 11:45-12:30 Breakout group discussions
  • 12:35 Group reports on the findings and results.
    •  Each working group is expected to work on a particular pre-defined topic, and articulate potential areas and particular topics for possible research within the DoD, as well as to create collaborative teams to present at next year’s symposium:
    • Summary of the most interesting (controversial) discussion points 
    • Potential areas for research in DoD, and specific research topics, if discussed
    • Identification of collaboration teams and topics to be presented at next year’s symposium

1pm Lunch (on your own)

 

Guest Speakers and Topics -- June 3rd, 2014 (09:40-11:30)

Network Science...

Speaker: TBA  
Time: 09:40-

Abstract:  TBA

Network Science... 

Speaker:  TBA
 Time: 10

Abstract:  TBA

Network Science...

Speaker: TBA Time: 11

Abstract: TBA

Break

 Poster Presentations:

Each presenter is expected to bring a portrait poster of the DoD sponsored research, and present a 1 minute overview in a Poster Lightening session.

 

 Topic-oriented breakout sessions leveraging the expertise of the network science community against solving the posed problems (Jesse)

  • 11:40 Overview of the topics and expectations of the working group (Jesse) 
  • 11:45-12:30 Breakout group discussions
  • 12:35 Group reports on the findings and results.
    •  Each working group is expected to work on a particular pre-defined topic, and articulate potential areas and particular topics for possible research within the DoD, as well as to create collaborative teams to present at next year’s symposium:
    • Summary of the most interesting (controversial) discussion points 
    • Potential areas for research in DoD, and specific research topics, if discussed
    • Identification of collaboration teams and topics to be presented at next year’s symposium
  •  Program Chairs

     

     Technical Report

    A technical report summarizing the discussions and presentations can be found after the meetings.

     Funding Opportunities

    The DARPA Information Innovation Office (I2O)  runs a number of programs that generate grants.  They are all listed here: http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/I2O/Programs/  

    Some of the specific efforts related to "big data" are: 
       
    XDATA
    http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/I2O/Programs/XDATA.aspx
        Big Mechanism http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/I2O/Programs/Big_Mechanism.aspx
        Anomaly Detection at Multiple Scales (ADAMS) http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/I2O/Programs/Anomaly_Detection_at_Multiple_Scales_(ADAMS).aspx
        Detection and Computational Analysis of Psychological Signals (DCAPS) http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/I2O/Programs/Detection_and_Computational_Analysis_of_Psychological_Signals_(DCAPS).aspx
        Durkheim Project
    http://www.durkheimproject.org/  
        Office of Naval Research (ONR)http://www.onr.navy.mil/
        Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR)
    http://www.wpafb.af.mil/afrl/afosr/  
        Army Research Lab (ARL)http://www.arl.army.mil/www/default.cfm

     

     Symposium's Proceedings

    A technical report summarizing the discussions and presentations can be found after the meetings.


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