Symposium Overview-- June 1st, 2015 (09:00-12:00)

The Network Science for National Defense Symposium is part of the "NetSci 2015" conference taking place 01-05 June 2015 in Zaragoza, Spain. The event will be held at the World Trade Center in Zaragoza. For full details visit their site using the logo link on the left.

Please email Ralucca Gera (rgera@nps.edu) if interested in attending.

Background

Network Science and other emerging data science methods have proven to be very effective for improving understanding and analysis in U.S. national security and intelligence missions. Because of the nature of these missions however, the benefit from these new analytic methods has not spread in a programmatic way to other mission areas in the Department of Defense. Individual organizations are beginning to use these methods in the social sciences to gain deeper understanding of human behavior for missions like personnel readiness and force management. This symposium will provide an opportunity to exchange these emerging ideas, expose network science practitioners to the important personnel issues in national defense, and allow DoD mission owners to explore the practical application of network science and other methods in addressing the issues facing the U.S. Department of Defense.

Expected outcomes

Each working group is expected to work on a particular pre-defined topic, and articulate potential areas and particular topics for possible research within the DoD, as well as to create collaborative teams to present at next year's symposium.

 Schedule -- June 1st, 2015 (09:00-12:00)

Network Science and other emerging data science methods have proven to be very effective for improving understanding and analysis in U.S. national security and intelligence missions. Because of the nature of these missions however, the benefit from these new analytic methods has not spread in a programmatic way to other mission areas in the Department of Defense. Individual organizations are beginning to use these methods in the social sciences to gain deeper understanding of human behavior for missions like personnel readiness and force management. This symposium will provide an opportunity to exchange these emerging ideas, expose network science practitioners to the important personnel issues in national defense, and allow DoD mission owners to explore the practical application of network science and other methods in addressing the issues facing the U.S. Department of Defense.

 

There will be 3 talks, followed by topic-oriented working groups. Use menu to the left to view Speakers and Topics.

Registration

  • 09:00-09:15 registration
  • 09:15-09:30 welcome, introductions and overview of the day (Ralucca) and motivation for the meeting (Jon)

Guest Speakers

  • 09:30-09:55 Jon Roginski,  Applied Mathematics  Department at the Naval Postgraduate School
  • 10:00-10:25 Ralucca Gera,  Applied Mathematics  Department at the Naval Postgraduate School
  • 10:30-10:55  Kevin Chan, United States Army Research Lab

Topic-oriented Working Groups

  • Overview of the topics and expectations of the working group
  • Group discussions.  Please email Ralucca Gera (rgera@nps.edu) with suggestions for topics to be considered for the working groups
  • Group reports on the findings and results.  Each working group is expected to work on a particular pre-defined topic, and articulate potential areas and particular topics for possible research within the DoD, as well as to create collaborative teams to present at next year's symposium:
    • Summary of the most interesting (controversial) discussion points
    • Potential areas for research in DoD, and specific research topics, if discussed
    • Identification of collaboration teams and topics to be presented at next year's symposium

Lunch (on your own)

 

Guest Speakers and Topics -- June 3rd, 2014 (09:30-11:00)

Network Science support to Army Cyber Command

Speaker: LTC Jon Roginski,  Applied Mathematics Department, Naval Postgraduate School  
Time: 09:30-09:55

Abstract:  The promise of network science is to provide a foundation that supports understanding the large, dynamic, complex networks that characterize life today. In the Department of Defense, we create, manage, and defend against change in these complex networks. However, the scientists and analysts providing decision support are constrained by an acknowledged lack of tools for proper modeling of network topology and quantification of network change. In this research, we introduce a matrix that captures more graph topological information than existing metrics. We show that where current structural metrics fail, the newly introduced distance-k matrix enables discrimination between graphs. We also show a methodology through which a network may be "triaged" to identify vertices which are potentially influential on the network's topology. Those candidate vertices are then analyzed using the distance-k matrix to determine the "distance between graphs," thereby quantifying the change in the network under vertex removal. The result is a "target set" of vertices a decision maker can choose from, based upon mission requirements, desired effect, and resources available-supporting attack, defense, and stability operations. We describe how such a methodology may contribute to decision making in Army’s Cyber Command.

Network Science support to the Department of Defense 

Speaker:  Prof. Ralucca Gera,  Applied Mathematics Department, Naval Postgraduate School
 Time: 10:00-10:25

Abstract:  A challenging problem in studying large actual networks is that data about the network is generally incomplete:  for most networks (such as Facebook or the Internet), it is impossible to observe all members of a network and all the interactions between them.  Generally, researches try to infer as much as possible of a network, and formulate it into a network.  For our study we chose four networks: two of them are models of graphs (an Erdős-Rényi graph and a Barabási-Albert graph) and two real networks (a Facebook and a Researchers collaboration network from Stanford's SNAP data set).  We consider these networks being ground truth, and we infer them using two methodologies.  In the talk we present our results of the node and edge count of the inferred networks compared to the true networks, and a new direction in measuring the accuracy of this inference from a graph theoretic point of view.

Network Science:  A collaborative approach to support the US Army

Speaker: Dr. Kevin Chan Time: 11:15-11:45

Abstract: The US Army Research Laboratory conducts basic research to support the US Army. As one of the primary research campaigns, ARL maintains a portfolio of research pertaining to the field of network science. As part of a collaborative effort to interface with leading researchers, ARL sponsors several basic research programs such as the Network Science Collaborative Technology Alliance, Network and Information Sciences International Technology Alliance, and the Cyber Security Collaborative Research Alliance.  These research collaborative ventures are consortiums between ARL, other government researchers, academics, and industry partners to conduct basic research in several related research thrusts. In this talk, we present an overview of current research challenges, current Army collaborative programs and emerging research directions in support of the Army.

Break

 Working Groups

Each working group is expected to work on a particular pre-defined topic, and articulate potential areas and particular topics for possible research within the DoD, as well as to create collaborative teams to present at next year's symposium. 
A technical report summarizing the discussions of the working groups can be found here.

 

 Program Co-Chairs

 

 Technical Report

A technical report summarizing the discussions and presentations can be found after the meetings.

 Funding Opportunities

The DARPA Information Innovation Office (I2O)  runs a number of programs that generate grants.  They are all listed here: http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/I2O/Programs/  

Some of the specific efforts related to "big data" are: 
   
XDATA
http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/I2O/Programs/XDATA.aspx
    Big Mechanism http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/I2O/Programs/Big_Mechanism.aspx
    Anomaly Detection at Multiple Scales (ADAMS) http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/I2O/Programs/Anomaly_Detection_at_Multiple_Scales_(ADAMS).aspx
    Detection and Computational Analysis of Psychological Signals (DCAPS) http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/I2O/Programs/Detection_and_Computational_Analysis_of_Psychological_Signals_(DCAPS).aspx
    Durkheim Project
http://www.durkheimproject.org/  
    Office of Naval Research (ONR)http://www.onr.navy.mil/
    Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR)
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/afrl/afosr/  
    Army Research Lab (ARL)http://www.arl.army.mil/www/default.cfm

 

 Symposium's Proceedings

A technical report summarizing the discussions and presentations can be found after the meetings.


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